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Child Safety Week: Advice for Parents

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In 2022 Child Safety Week runs from 6th - 12th June.  Trading Standards are helping to raise awareness of Child Safety Week an annual community education campaign which gives facts and safety tips on the main accident risks to children. 

The following is taken from a Child Safety Week newsletter sent by Herts County Council.

Button Battery safety

Smaller batteries can be inserted into places such as ears and noses, causing serious injuries for children if undetected. Lithium ‘coin cell’ batteries (about the size of a five pence piece) are the most dangerous; follow the safety messages below on how to keep children safe:

  • Storing spare batteries securely
  • Knowing what products use button batteries
  • Educating older children about button batteries
  • Discarding dead button batteries straightaway
  • Acting promptly if you suspect a child has swallowed a button battery.

Further information is available here.

Small, high-powered magnets/magnetic toys

We increasingly see small, high-powered magnets in our everyday lives, on fridges, in adult desk toys, or used as fashion and party accessories.

How to keep children safe - Check your home:

  • If you have toys or adult desk toys with small magnets, a magnetic sphere construction set, or keep magnets on your fridge, then move them out of the reach of small children.
  • If a toy is faulty and magnets have come loose, get it fixed or dispose of it safely.
  • Don’t attach magnets to glassware as they can become loose and then easily swallowed.
  • Talk to children about the dangers
  • Using magnetic products as fake piercings, on the tongue, mouth or nose, increases the risk of inhalation or ingestion. Discuss with children and teenagers why small high-powered magnets are dangerous, and why they shouldn’t use them as fake piercings on their body, or as decorative items on glassware.
     

If you suspect your child has swallowed a magnet If you think your child has swallowed a magnet, take them straight to the nearest A&E or call 999 for an ambulance. Symptoms may not be obvious.

Please report any product that you think is unsafe to your local Trading Standards team via Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 0808 223 1133 or visit their advice pages for more support Consumer - Citizens Advice.

For child safety advice, check out the Child Accident Prevention Trust website.

        


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